HEED T., KUBYSHKIN A.I. Armageddon: Comparative Images of the Nuclear Conflict Between the United States and the Soviet Union in American Cinema

DOI: https://doi.org/10.15688/jvolsu4.2019.5.18

Tom Heed

EDD (Education Doctorate Degree), Professor Emeritus,

Ramapo Сollege,

Ramapo Valley Rd, 505, 07430 Mahwah, New Jersey, USA

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7308-3896

Alexander I. Kubyshkin

Doctor of Sciences (History), Professor,

Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Saint Petersburg State University,

University Emb., 7-9, 199034 Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0633-2842


Abstract. Introduction. Film offers a valuable mirror to reflect on how we assess our present and past. The Cold War was one of the most troubled periods in history. Two huge, wealthy, energetic, and creative societies competed in all areas. During those decades of electric change and development they faced each other with weapons of ever increasing lethality. The film industry in both countries looked at how the nuclear exchange would impact in both lands. Over the decades as the weaponry changed, as the patterns of leadership changed, as the economy of the world evolved, both nations’ film industry painted different images of what Armageddon could look like. If we compare comparable films, across similar decades, what do we learn of that era and those people?

Methods and Materials. The methods used in the article are comparative, analytical and functional systematic ones. The materials used are the following: 1) five films of both cultures from different decades; 2) secondary accounts of contemporary events; 3) secondary reviews of the selected films, and 4) secondary accounts of parallel incidents.

Analysis. With the complex weapons of the Cold War era we certainly need to worry about the technological imperative and the potential role of accident and unintended consequences. However, we are blessed that the doom day scenario has not yet erupted. We are most fortunate that the dire warning of many US filmmakers have not been realized. Indeed with the coming advent of AI technology and 5G communications, we may have more to fear than ever before.

Results. After fifty some years of the Cold War, films continue to project the worst fears of people. As we review these films across the several decades we see constancy, the films again and again distrust technology.

Key words: Soviet-American relations, Cold war, nuclear conflict threat, American cinema, film propaganda.

Citation. Heed T., Kubyshkin A.I. Armageddon: Comparative Images of the Nuclear Conflict Between the United States and the Soviet Union in American Cinema. Vestnik Volgogradskogo gosudarstvennogo universiteta. Seriya 4. Istoriya. Regionovedenie. Mezhdunarodnye otnosheniya [Science Journal of Volgograd State University. History. Area Studies. International Relations], 2019, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 250-258. DOI: https://doi.org/10.15688/jvolsu4.2019.5.18.

Лицензия Creative Commons

Armageddon: Comparative Images of the Nuclear Conflict Between the United States and the Soviet Union in American Cinema by Heed T., Kubyshkin A.I. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Attachments:
Download this file (1_Heed_Kubyshkin.pmd.pdf) 1_Heed_Kubyshkin.pmd.pdf
URL: https://hfrir.jvolsu.com/index.php/en/component/attachments/download/2068
288 Downloads